Extremely Rare & Forgotten Music/MultiCultural Blogger
What I’m Listening to?
I would imagine that absolutely no one from this generation would know anything about The Carpenters.  The Carpenter's music appeals to a specific type of audience, that I think hardly exists anymore. To be honest, I'm not sure what genre they even belong to; they weren't really country, and they weren't really folk artists either; yet quite a few of their music comes very close to sounding like elevator music. I guess the best category for them would be "easy listening?" Their music is extremely mellow. In fact, some of their music is so mellow that I wouldn't recommend listening to it if your mood is down. However, I think it's the perfect music to listen to whilst reading a magazine, or just chillin. Actually, a lot of their music would make great "cool down" choices (after an exercise).  My favorites are, "(They Long To Be) Close To You," "We've Only Just Begun," "Rainy Days And Mondays," "Superstar," which was again redone by Luther Vandross, and "Yesterday Once More."

I would imagine that absolutely no one from this generation would know anything about The Carpenters. The Carpenter's music appeals to a specific type of audience, that I think hardly exists anymore. To be honest, I'm not sure what genre they even belong to; they weren't really country, and they weren't really folk artists either; yet quite a few of their music comes very close to sounding like elevator music. I guess the best category for them would be "easy listening?" Their music is extremely mellow. In fact, some of their music is so mellow that I wouldn't recommend listening to it if your mood is down. However, I think it's the perfect music to listen to whilst reading a magazine, or just chillin. Actually, a lot of their music would make great "cool down" choices (after an exercise). My favorites are, "(They Long To Be) Close To You (1970)," "We've Only Just Begun (1970)," "Rainy Days And Mondays (1971)," "Superstar (1971)," which was again redone by Luther Vandross in 1983, and "Yesterday Once More (1973)." Karen Carpenter died of cancer on February 1983. She had a very unique and distinct voice and music. There was no one else like them. Her brother, Richard Carpenter had made a couple of albums since Karen's death; however, they have not done well. I guess the public was to used to hearing Karen's distinct voice.

PODCAST/YOUTUBE



Sorry for my absence. I took some time to figure out some new ideas on revamping my blog. I know i’ve done this several times; however, it’s all about finding out who I am as a youtuber, and what works best for me.



Rhapsody has a new beta version of their PC software. I know that most people use Rhapsody on other devices, however, if you have saved a lot of music on your account, it becomes more efficient to manage your music using the PC software. It’s worth checking it out.



Have you noticed that despite access to literally millions of songs being made available through internet streaming services, you still don’t have all your classics? Why are they so hard to find? Just airing out some thoughts to you guys.



I actually had to split this video because I felt it was too long. I may post the other portion as an article later on. Since technically, people are still shopping for the holidays until about Jan 1st. I thought that this would be a perfect opportunity to give my personal tips on shopping online safely.



This is really my response to an article I’ve read recently, were a NYC “psychic” conned this women out of a large sum of money, to bring her luck and fortune. Got to love those old beliefs. They can get you in this kind of trouble every time. If you would like to read the article I’m referring to, please click here.



Initially, I wasn’t going to do a video on streaming services, ’cause I’ve already touched a little bit on them in my earlier blog posts. However, the way technology is going, I feel that the “vintage” community needs to talk about this more. Yes, I understand the whole nostalgic feeling of buying an actual album in the stores, etc., etc., but these experiences are slowly fading away. They’re not gone, just moving in to the digital world (we’re the belong, archived and preserved). As physical resources for vintage nostalgia seems to dwindle before our eyes at a rapid pace, they’ve thankfully found a new home in the cyber-sphere. Where do you buy your classic music? Are you utilizing all of the various digital services that now have a growing library of vintage films and movies? Which one of these services are the best? I go over just a couple of today’s popular music services, and discuss why I have chosen Rhapsody to be my primary music service.

© 2013 Yogi / Vintagenewscast.com



Hey guys, been a long time since I’ve made a video. This weekend, I am paying tribute to Booker T. Washington.[correction: I was tired when I made the video; it’s Hampton Institute, not Hamston..LOL

 The GOLDEN GATE (JUBILEE) QUARTET

The GOLDEN GATE (JUBILEE) QUARTET

In 1925, four students at Booker T. Washington High in Norfolk, Virginia – Henry Owens, Clyde Riddick, Willie “Bill” Johnson, Orlandus Wilson – founded the Gates. It is of interest to know that another group called the Golden Gate Quartet was organized in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1892. In this podcast, I would like to share a negro-spiritual called “Anyhow” by The Golden Jubilee Quartet, song in 1943. Now in the public domain. Please click download to listen to song. Or subscribe to my podcast.

donna_summer_1977

Donna Summer (born LaDonna Adrian Gaines December 31, 1948) is an American singer and songwriter who gained prominence during the disco era of music. Summer was trained as a gospel singer prior to her introduction to the music industry and has always been known for her “Powerhouse” Vocal delivery. Though she is most notable for her disco hits, Summer’s repertoire has expanded to include contemporary R&B, Rock, Mainstream pop, and Gospel. Summer is one of the most successful recording artists of the 1970s and 1980s and was the first artist to have three consecutive double albums hit #1 on the Billboard charts. She also became the first female artist to have four number-one singles in a thirteen-month period. Billboard magazine has noted that Summer’s extensive career has landed her as the “Eighth” most succesful career by a female. Summer’s website reports an estimate that she has sold more than 130 million records worldwide.

Born in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, she was one of seven children raised by devout Christian parents. She sang in church, and in her teens joined a funk group called The Crow, so named because Donna was the only black member of the group. At eighteen, Gaines left home and school to audition for a role in the cast of the Broadway musical, Hair. Unsuccessful in getting the part in the Broadway show (Melba Moore got the role), she was offered the European Tour when the show moved to Germany, where Summer also performed in the German versions of several musicals including Godspell and Show Boat. She settled in Munich and also performed with the Viennese Folk Opera and the pop band Munich Machine.

In 1971, Gaines released a single in Europe entitled “Sally Go ‘Round The Roses”, her first solo recording. The single was unsuccessful, however, and she had to wait until 1974 to launch a solo career. Gaines married Austrian actor Helmuth Sommer (“Summer” is an Anglicization of his last name) in 1972 and gave birth to daughter Mimi the following year. Summer did various musical jobs in studios and theaters for several years, including the pop group FamilyTree from 1974-75.

After her divorce from Sommer, she married her second husband, American musician Bruce Sudano, in 1980. They have two daughters named Brooklyn and Amanda. Sudano was a member of the ’70s groups Alive N Kickin’ and The Brooklyn Dreams. You can read the rest on Wikipedia.  Click Download to listen to short podcast.

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Interview with Alice Gaston, Gee’s Bend, Alabama, 1941

Alice Gaston: We was talking about in the old war time, the old slavery time. I can remember when, uh, I can remember when the Yankees come through and, uh, they carried my father away and carried away, my si, two sisters and one brother. And, uh, they left me. And I can remember when my missus used to run in the garden, from the Yankees and tell us if they come, don’t tell them where they at. Told, don’t tell nobody where they at when they come and they all come and they told me, don’t get scared now and tell them, where they is, where they is. I told them no, we told them no. And uh, when they come and ask for them I told them I didn’t know there they was, and they was in the woods. And this was at the house. And my father, when my father left, he carried with the, he went away with the Yankees, and carried two, carried two, two girls and one son, the oldest one. Carried them with him. And he with the Yankees. And I can remember that. And uh, my old missus was named Mrs. M., and the master was name Mr. F. I. [pause]? Mr. F. I

Robert Sonkin: They treat you pretty good?

Alice Gaston: Yes sir, they treat me nice. They treat me nice as they could treat me. And then after they left, after they died, then I heard, still here and am here until yet. And the white folks all been treating me mighty nice ever since they? knowed me. They treating me all now, that knows me, they treating me nice. I’s came up here over here from Mr. Y., from over to [unintelligible] and come to Mr. Y.’s place up here. And he kept me there until he, he died, him and his wife. And then I come on then from that, on down here, and I’m here yet. An’ they all treating me mighty nice, all the white folks that know me, they treats me nice. And if I want anything, I’ll ask for it. I was taught in that a way by my old master. Don’t steal, don’t lie, and if you want anything, ask for it. Be honest in what you get. That was what I was raised up with. And I’m that a way today.

Robert Sonkin: What’s the government been doing for you here?

Alice Gaston: They been treating me fine. Ever since I been, ever since I been here with the government they treat me nice. I was in a old house down there, took me out the old house and put me up there in a good house where they could take care of me. And I’m in there yet. I don’t find no fault. Give me enough food to eat, give me clothes to wear. They been treating me just as nice as they can. I can’t find no fault.

Robert Sonkin: Pretty, pretty happy then.

Alice Gaston: Yes sir, yeh.

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Click Download to listen to the original recording.