OTHER ISSUES IN THE WORLD

I came across an article quite by accident. The article is called “Why Music Streaming Services Need To Attract An Older Audience,” published about a year ago. As my followers know, getting some older folk to use technology is like pulling teeth, and two toes!!! While the industry recognize this is a challenging issue, I’m thinking just how hard it would be to overcome this? I’m also seriously wondering if this is even possible? I would like to have a real talk for a minute here. Despite the negative feelings many independent/or new artists have concerning music streaming, streaming services like Spotify have single handedly saved the music industry from being sucked in by the black piracy hole (or vortex, if you will).

With few exceptions, the majority of streaming platform users tend to be largely in the under 35 set, but these services might do well to start courting an older demographic, with their deep pockets and streaming compatible tastes in music.

Although I don’t agree with the above quote (in regards to the “deep pocket” reference), I found it interesting how they broke down “the older demographic,” but did not compare data to older people who are on a “fixed income.” Which is a segue to almost the heart of what I really wanted to discuss. I think it’s safe to say that any change is difficult for most older folk; that is especially true when it comes to sticking with familiarity. Things have changed so much in regards to technology that most are overwhelmed with it. Some don’t even bother, assuming they won’t be able to understand it. But guys, you don’t need to be a programmer to know how to use Spotify. It is so freakin’ easy, you’ll say to yourself, why the f**k did I wait so long? 😀 And most importantly, its absolutely FREE!!! Legal!!!!! And the premium service is only optional. But even at $10/mo. is a steel!

I think the problem consist of 3 main factors. First, we know that for most people, music stops around the age of 35. Meaning, after that age, we usually don’t have the desire to listen to newer music past that age. Therefore, I think if streaming services want to attract the older demographic, you need to promote older music. Second, I really do think the the younger generation can be a huge help. The best way to get an older person’s attention is to show your older loved one just how easy it is. Not just show them how easy it is, go and find one of their old records that is so scratched and f**ked up it can’t be played. Then show them how to search for it on Spotify, then play it. Then watch their eyes pop out of their socket! LOL  I never understood how older folk who love music as much as they do, not have the slightest bit of curiosity? Maybe they’re confusing today’s streaming with the old Napster? I don’t know. Lastly, if your loved one decides they want to go with the premium, show them how easy it is to download using Spotify! Now they can take their music with them, and not be chained to YouTube! Show them what Shazam is, and how they can use it to discover almost all their old music on cassette! Not only will they be happy their listening to their childhood music, they’ll have fun doing it.

VintageNewscast.com

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You know, I’m not sure if a lot of people are aware of this but, Netflix streaming has changed from a five star user rating system, to a thumbs up rating system. I was really upset about that at first. I actually called to complain about. True fans of anything, especially when it comes to music and movies know, a rating isn’t always as simple as just a thumbs up, or a thumbs down. Sometimes you need that 5 star rating system because it allows you to rate movies that are complicated to rate. There are movies where we feel neutral. In other words, there are movies not bad enough to say don’t watch, but they’re not good enough to recommend them either. The Netflix rep told me that the rating system was changed to simply help them to programmatically suggest similar movies we’ve thumbed up. She claimed that this is what users have been asking for. I said to myself, “really?” If that’s true, don’t the users realize that we’re then forced to like or don’t like movies we feel neutral about. I don’t think that’s good either. But of course, because the representative I was talking to was obviously speaking as an employee, and not as a movie fan, I didn’t feel like she identified with what I was trying to say. So, what else is new right?

I just found it so hard to believe that users have chose to become so simple minded that they would ask to get rid of the five star rating for a thumbs up! Then I’ve realized, this may be because of the popularity of sites such as Facebook, and YouTube. It just maybe because sites like those are so heavily used that, it may be more a matter of desiring consistency. But those sites aren’t movie sites, they’re social media. If this is truly what the majority of users are asking for, I think this is a huge mistake, and this is not helping each other (from the standpoint of a real fan). The best way I can explain it, it’s like remembering that song you heard when you met your first boyfriend, and trying to explain how you emotionally felt to a computer in machine code (zeros and ones/no and yes, without the ability to offer context). It’s just not possible. Well, I know I can’t do anything about it, but it’s still so disappointing tho. Just my humble Opinion. If you ask me, I really do think it was a decision to force people to watch movies marked bad, ’cause those studios are not making any money. If you offer their true five star rating, why would anybody watch a 1 star rating? Well, as we all know, it’s not the first time they’ve made bad decisions.

© VintageNewscast.com

Adam-Richman

I thought about doing something a little different and fun. I know that a lot of people who are stuck in a particular mindset, in terms of what defines beauty. However, when it comes to someone’s weight, I’ve always had the belief that NOT everyone looks good smaller in size. I’ve always felt that way ever since a I was a child. Some people who’s never been thin sometimes look sick when they lose too much weight (trying to live someone else’s standard of beauty). Let’s be real, fat phobia exist, just like many other phobias. It’s not always about being “healthy,” too many people get off of fat shaming people. Getting into other people’s business instead of their OWN.

I’d like to start off with Adam Richman. It’s funny because I was so accustomed to seeing his body larger on “Man Verses Food,” that he looks weird with his weight loss. When I say weird, I don’t mean bad; at least he didn’t lose so much weight that he looks like a bobble-head. I don’t think that’s a healthy look for anybody. I don’t care what anybody says.

Paul-Wall

Next is rapper Paul Wall. You know, I always thought he looked ok bigger. He looked good on camera when he danced, and it is my opinion that he held his weight well. Now that He lost the weight, he looks incredibly handsome. He looks like an entirely different person. I’m going to say I think he looked good both ways. But now that he’s smaller, he looks so different he looks nothing like a rapper now.

Chris-Pratt

Chris Bratt, definitely a hunk now that he lost weight. Not only that, he stopped at a healthy slim weight, and not anorexic slim. Maybe it’s different with men? When women talk about weight loss, a lot of women always trying to get in to a size 1 and below LOL. Not everybody is built to be their desired weight.

Kevin-Liles

Now about Kevin Liles. I don’t know about you guys, but this is one of those cases I think he looks better and healthier a little larger. He looked like a nice big o’l hug-able football bear. He wasn’t fat, he was just nice and thick, and haters couldn’t take it. Period.

Al-Roker

Now, I don’t judge people, however, Al Roker is the only guy that I truly feel he should have gained some back. I’ve actually seen photos of him even smaller. Now, I tend to notice things other people miss. I immediately noticed that after he lost all that weight, his skin changed dramatically! I don’t recall seeing that on any person of color quite in that way. I mean, I’m not joking, when I was watching his weather broadcast, I actually remember trying to adjust my picture because I thought something was wrong, and it turned out to be Al’s actual skin texture! O my goodness, he looked double his age after he lost the weight. Now, I know that some of us who are diabetic, we sometimes suffer dry skin occasionally, I thought maybe that was it. Who knows, maybe he was on some medication that had a skin side effect? All I know, He didn’t appear healthy to me after he lost that weight. Kudos to him though!

© VintageNewscst.com

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PinkFinished

I know there exist a lot of people who love to feed the propaganda monster; and will probably dislike me for this article. But, what the hell, It’s my blog. Do you really think there’s a White conspiracy in the music industry, to “steal Black music” away from Black culture? I’ve heard this talk over and over for quite some time now. As someone who has always had music in my blood since I was extremely young, I have a very different opinion on this matter. You know when I was little, there were many performers I listened to, that I never knew they were actually White. One of those people I distinctly remembered was Tom Jones; and apparently I wasn’t the only person who thought so; many people thought he was back then. I also thought that Michael McDonald was also Black for awhile until I actually saw him on TV. The reverse has also happened. I thought Chuck Berry was White until I saw him on TV. So, what exactly is the point of my two previous statements? The point is music influences all cultures regardless of where you come from. Second, despite what people think, (or want to believe), I don’t think we can put a color on music. The color of a person’s skin doesn’t denote their culture, neither should music.

Now I know a lot of you may think I am plum off my rocker! Yes it is true that Black music has literally influenced the world, I don’t think any music historian, or any average music lover would try and challenge this. However, understand that it is because Black music has been such an influence, it is only natural that other groups of people will try to mimic it because it’s so great! This is another reason why I suggested a few posts ago, to listen to intentional radio. If you listen to current music from India, Japan, Africa, and yes even Arabian countries, almost all of them sound American. Many Asian countries are very heavily in to hip hop. If it were not for the different language, you’d think that all of their music was produced by Pharrell, or Dr. Dre. No one is bitching that Japan is trying to “take Black music away.” I’ve heard some Arab artists that can drop lyrics better than some American artists! No one is trying to proclaim or take away anything, it’s just the nature of good music, everybody wants to do the same. The reality is, other cultures fought a long time to try and keep their traditional music, but it is fading away, just like American classic music. I think trying to take ownership of a style of music that was once ours, is like the military yelling and screaming on television that the internet was started by them, and they want to be acknowledged. The internet is so huge, and has been etched in to the fabric of our lives, does it really matter?

I think what’s important is to try and focus on keeping the memories of our dying music, rather than spending a pointless life time of pointing fingers, of an issue that really makes no sense.

© VintageNewscast.com

grooveshark

I was about to write an article that GrooveShark shut down as of last month. However, it looks like only the U.S. has shut down (grooveshark.com), not the British (grooveshark.io). If I remember correctly, I’ve read that they allowed more music to stream on their service, then the licenses they’ve paid for. I don’t think they were trying to do anything illegal; it just may have been that there was a technical mix up (physical hardware/network). Unfortunately, because of that, they got caught up in all kinds of U.S./international copyright legalities, and got sued. Copyright can and do get ugly. That’s unfortunate.